Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Arizona Drug Endangered Children

Arizona Drug Endangered Children
(DEC)
Multidisciplinary/Integrated Protocol
DEC Task Force
September 30, 2003
For more information Contact:
Mark Evans
Assistant Attorney General
602-542-8431
Mark.Evans@azag.gov
http://www.azag.gov/DEC
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The development of the protocol and web site were made possible through the
dedication and commitment of the representatives of the DEC Task Force. Tools have
been developed to provide up-to-date information so that professionals and other
individuals have access to resources to address this growing problem in their local
community.
Representatives from the following agencies participated in the Task Force:
􀂃 Office of the Arizona Attorney General
􀂃 Arizona Department of Economic Security, Child Protective Services (DES-CPS)
􀂃 Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office, High Intensity Drug Traffic Area (MCSO/HIDTA)
Clandestine Lab Task Force
􀂃 Phoenix Police Department, Family Investigations Bureau, Child Crimes
􀂃 St. Joseph’s Hospital
􀂃 Childhelp USA
􀂃 Mesa Center Against Family Violence
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................1
PURPOSE OF THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROTOCOL ...............................................2
BACKGROUND/PROBLEM ............................................................................................2
MISSION AND GUIDING VALUES .................................................................................3
PARTNER AGENCIES....................................................................................................4
SUGGESTED TRAINING................................................................................................5
WEBSITE ........................................................................................................................6
INTRODUCTION TO THE DEC PROTOCOL .................................................................6
Initial Actions................................................................................................................8
Safeguarding Children .................................................................................................8
On Site Investigation....................................................................................................8
Prosecution ..................................................................................................................8
DRUG ENDANGERED CHILDREN (DEC) PROTOCOL ................................................9
APPENDICES ...............................................................................................................17
Appendix A: CPS DEC Protocol................................................................................18
Appendix B: Law Enforcement DEC Protocol ...........................................................19
Appendix C: Medical Personnel DEC Protocol .........................................................20
Appendix D: Resource Information ...........................................................................21
Appendix E: Statutes ................................................................................................23
Appendix F: How to Start a DEC Team ....................................................................25
Appendix G: Exposing Children to Drugs and Clandestine Meth Labs is Child Abuse
..................................................................................................................................27
Appendix H: Sample Forms ......................................................................................29
Appendix H.1-Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services .....................30
Appendix H.2-Methamphetamine Medical Screen Approval Form.............................38
DEC Protoc1o l
Multidisciplinary/Integrated Protocol for
Drug Endangered Children (DEC)
INTRODUCTION
The Arizona Drug Endangered Children (DEC) Program (formerly referred to as the
Meth and Kids Initiative) was established in 2000 by Arizona’s former Attorney General,
Janet Napolitano, to address problems associated with methamphetamine production in
homes with children present through a coordinated response by the Attorney General’s
Office, state and local law enforcement, Child Protective Services and medical
personnel. Representatives of the Arizona Attorney General, Maricopa County Sheriff’s
Office High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (MCSO/HIDTA) Clandestine Lab Task Force,
Phoenix Police Department-Family Investigations Bureau, Child Crimes Unit, Arizona
Department of Economic Security, Child Protective Services (DES-CPS), St. Joseph’s
Hospital and Childhelp USA, and Department of Publlic Safety (DPS) Crime Lab serve
on the DEC Task Force and have developed a model interagency protocol for the
investigation of methamphetamine lab cases with children involved.
The current Attorney General, Terry Goddard, has carried this effort forward. For the
past three years the DEC Program has focused primarily on Maricopa County cases
and Task Force members have provided training and technical assistance to agencies
throughout the state. The Governor’s Division of Substance Abuse Policy has provided
funding, which has enabled the Attorney General’s Office to dedicate a prosecutor and
legal assistant to the DEC Program. Since implementation of the collaborative,
multidisciplinary approach, investigations and communications have improved in every
respect among all involved agencies.
Planning for the future of the DEC Program is now underway. Participants in this effort
include staff from the Governor’s Division of Substance Abuse Policy, the Attorney
Generals Office, the Arizona Department of Economic Security-Child Protective
Services (DES-CPS), medical personnel, and law enforcement agencies, primarily
MCSO/HIDTA.
Representatives from the DEC Task Force worked together to formalize the
multidisciplinary protocol to address the needs of children and ensure the safety of
children who are present at an investigation of a methamphetamine laboratory.
Additionally, the representatives have finalized web-based content to provide an
overview of the problem that methamphetamine production presents to the community
and the amount of risk that children face who live in those environments. The website
may be accessed through the Arizona Attorney General’s site at
www.azag.gov/DEC .
DEC Protoc2o l
PURPOSE OF THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROTOCOL
The purpose of the multidisciplinary protocol is to provide professionals from Child
Protective Services, Law Enforcement, Medical Services, and Prosecution a basis for
the development of community specific procedures for situations where there are drug
endangered children as a result of clandestine methamphetamine labs or other drug
production, trafficking and abuse. Memoranda of Understanding among the key
partners should also be considered to formalize roles and relationships beyond the
protocol.
Implementation of a DEC protocol that has been adapted for local community
requirements will ensure that children who may be at risk for exposure to
methamphetamine receive protection, advocacy and support through a multidisciplinary
approach and that investigations provide the best opportunity for prosecution of
individuals involved in manufacturing, selling, and abusing methamphetamine and other
drugs and endangering children in the process.
BACKGROUND/PROBLEM
The production of methamphetamine (meth) in home-based drug labs confronts Arizona
with a unique set of problems that other illegal drugs have never before presented.
The chemicals used to manufacture meth, the production process, and the waste
generated as a result of that process pose very real and serious dangers to the public
and the environment. These dangers include toxic poisoning, chemical and thermal
burns, fires, and explosions. The children who live in and around meth labs are at the
greatest risk of harm due to their developmental nature, the abuse and neglect
perpetrated on them by their caretakers and the many others who frequent their drugladen
homes, and their inability to protect themselves.
Responding to a suspected meth lab where children are present requires a carefully
planned and coordinated approach involving multiple partners. Those who make meth
often use meth, making them prone to violent behavior. Meth producers often try to
keep their illegal operations a secret through the use of weapons, explosive traps, and
surveillance equipment.
The DEC Program has coordinated and improved the efforts of local law enforcement,
Child Protective Services (CPS), medical professionals, and the Attorney General’s
Office to respond to meth labs where children are present, and to prosecute those
responsible. The DEC Program ensures timely access to qualified personnel who can
respond to the immediate and longer-term medical and safety needs of drug
endangered children.
Since 2000, the Arizona DEC Program has resulted in the successful prosecution of
nearly 100 meth lab cases involving nearly 200 children. Building on its success in
Maricopa County, efforts continue through training and technical assistance to expand
the DEC Program throughout Arizona.
DEC Protoc3o l
MISSION AND GUIDING VALUES
The following mission and guiding values1 reflect the commitment of the DEC Task
Force and program to ensure children exposed to drug environments are protected.
Mission
We will be unrelenting in the pursuit of safety for children exposed to the extreme
dangers of drug abuse environments in a manner that gives the child the best
opportunity for a happy and productive future. Our efforts will include government
agencies, private organizations, and the general public working in collaboration to:
􀂃 prevent drug abuse,
􀂃 provide resources to children when drug abuse prevention efforts fail, and
􀂃 aggressively break the cycle of drug abuse caused by those who manufacture, sell,
and use drugs.
Guiding Values
The Arizona DEC Program is guided by and promotes the following values:
Safety
􀂃 We will relentlessly pursue the end of drug abuse to prevent children from
experiencing the physical, emotional, and psychological damage that exposure to
drug environments cause.
􀂃 We will enhance the safety of children by removing them from dangerous drug
environments and providing them with appropriate follow-up care and services.
􀂃 We will return or place children in family environments that are completely free of
dangerous drugs.
Collaboration
􀂃 We will insist on the participation of everyone to actively pursue the end of social
tolerance to the abuse of dangerous drugs.
􀂃 We will form alliances, partnerships, and organizations across all government and
private services to ensure appropriate tools and resources exist to identify, remove,
and treat children in dangerous drug environments.
􀂃 We will identify and implement multidisciplinary services and strategies necessary to
break the cycle of drug abuse.
Dedication
􀂃 We will hold ourselves accountable to appropriately provide the services necessary
to accomplish the mission of the Arizona DEC Program.
􀂃 We will vigorously pursue the institutionalization of the Arizona DEC Program.
􀂃 We will continually evaluate the effectiveness of our efforts to ensure the Arizona
DEC Program’s mission is achieved.
1 Adapted from the National Steering Committee for the Advancement and Adoption of the Concept of Drug Endangered Children
DEC Protoc4o l
PARTNER AGENCIES
There are several agencies and organizations that participate in the DEC protocol. First
responders to an investigation scene include Law Enforcement (both child crime
investigators and drug investigators), CPS Investigators, Medical Personnel (generally
medical doctors and nurses who treat the children at the appropriate medical facility),
Fire Departments, HAZMAT Teams and fire departments.
The following provides an overview of the responsibilities of the primary responders as
well as other partner agencies:
Law Enforcement: Responsible for all investigative activities taking place at the site of
the meth lab. Law Enforcement includes representatives from a variety of agencies
including the county Sheriff’s Office, the local community Police Department, the
Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS), the MCSO/HIDTA and should include an
individual that specializes in child crimes investigation. The focus of the drug
investigator is to collect evidence for court purposes. The child crimes investigator
conducts the forensic interview of the child victim to establish the elements of child
abuse and to conduct the child crimes investigation. There may also be a DEC
investigator to provide coordination of activities. The DPS crime laboratory provides
support to the criminal investigation including testing samples for forensic evidence.
Law enforcement and CPS cooperate at the scene to insure the child’s safety.
Child Protective Services (CPS): Provides for the immediate protection and insures the
safety of the child, addresses temporary custody and shelter needs, transports the child
for medical evaluation, and coordinates placement of the child. The CPS Investigator
also addresses the needs of the caregivers related to other community services. The
CPS Investigator also ensures that law enforcement knows where the child is being
placed and coordinates arrangements for the medical evaluation either at a child
advocacy center or at the appropriate medical facility. The focus of the CPS
investigation is to gather factual information related to the potential dependency case,
identify hazards to the child, ensure the welfare of the child and arrange for other
needed services.
Fire Department, Emergency Response, and HAZMAT Team: Provide assistance in
assessment of environmental hazards that the meth lab presents and assist in
facilitating access to the certified environmental remediation agencies that have
expertise in clean-up and certifying that the home is again habitable. HAZMAT will test
the air quality at the scene for both safety and evidentiary purposes.
Medical Personnel: Conduct medical evaluations including an Early Periodic Screening,
Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) screen. In general, when a community has a child
advocacy center, the center should be used as the location for medical evaluations and
examinations. If a community does not have an advocacy center, inclusion of a specific
physician, clinic or hospital that has expertise in medical examinations for suspected
child abuse including exposure to drug environments would be appropriate.
DEC Protoc5o l
Prosecution: The Attorney General’s Office and/or the County Attorney’s Office will be
involved in the criminal prosecution related to DEC cases (i.e. child abuse and drug
charges). In general, due to the highly specialized nature of the cases, the Attorney
General’s Office has the primary responsibility for prosecution in Maricopa County (and
is available to provide prosecution statewide). The Attorney General’s Office also
handles the child dependency action in Juvenile Court, statewide. The Attorney
General’s Office of Victim Services (or the County Attorney’s Office in most of the other
counties) provides victim advocacy for child victims, which includes working with CPS
and the legal guardian as appropriate to keep them apprised of criminal proceedings
and the child’s rights as a victim of abuse.
SUGGESTED TRAINING
As practical, all members of the response team should have specialized safety and
hazards training related to the investigations of drug environments and meth labs in
order to protect against possible exposure to dangerous substances. Law enforcement
training and certification is available through the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration
(DEA) in connection with the MCSO/HIDTA Clandestine Lab Task Force. Cross
training, particularly between Child Protective Services and Law Enforcement is also
critical to ensure that appropriate evidence and information is collected that is
necessary for either the child abuse investigation or the drug investigation.
Law Enforcement recommends that the DEC Officer be a specialized "crimes against
children" investigator with a suggested minimum requirement of a Clandestine Lab
Certification through the DEA as well as participating in the following trainings:
􀂃 Basic Investigation Course
􀂃 40 hours of Child Forensic Interview training
DEC PROGRAM TRAINING COMPONENT
The Arizona Attorney General’s Office in conjunction with COPS and HIDTA offers
Responding to Drug Endangered Children Training. This is a one-day training session
regarding methamphetamine, its manufacture, volatility, and perilous effects on adults,
children, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on all aspects of the
multidisciplinary approach. The DEC training team usually consists of a drug detective,
child crimes detective, CPS investigator, Assistant Attorney General, and a physician.
Occasionally, a DPS crime lab chemist will also comprise the training agenda.
The website located at www.azag.gov/DEC has up to date information on
available training. Specific requests for training in areas statewide can also be
accommodated.
DEC Protoc6o l
WEBSITE
The Arizona Drug Endangered Children Website is part of the Arizona Attorney
General’s Office website at www.azag.gov/DEC, and is a comprehensive and
companion resource for the protocol. The website includes:
􀂃 A more in-depth overview of the methamphetamine problem.
􀂃 Links to Arizona Revised Statutes related to the DEC program.
􀂃 Links to articles about the methamphetamine problem.
􀂃 Links to other resource websites that provide in-depth information about DEC
programs in other states, recognition of methamphetamine use and manufacture,
treatment resources, articles and other information.
􀂃 Information about upcoming training, conferences and other DEC events.
INTRODUCTION TO THE DEC PROTOCOL
The following provides an overview of the DEC protocol:
Initial Actions:
􀂃 When local law enforcement personnel receive a report of a suspected meth lab,
they will first determine through a thorough investigation if a meth lab is likely
operating. If children are present, their safety is a primary concern. The appropriate
investigators, including the drug investigators, child crimes investigator, and CPS are
notified and respond. Typically, drug investigators call out other first responders
upon discovery of the children.
􀂃 CPS works jointly with law enforcement at the scene to ensure that the child is
protected from further chemical exposure and that information necessary for both
the drug investigation and the potential child abuse case is collected.
􀂃 An interview of the child can take place at the scene, but generally occurs in a more
child friendly environment such as a family advocacy center.
􀂃 After the child is removed, the crime scene is isolated. If the CPS worker determines
that there is sufficient information to indicate child abuse, the CPS hotline is called
and a formal report is filed. This is different from the general practice where a CPS
report is made before an investigation takes place. Concurrent investigations include
drug/narcotics, child crimes, and Child Protective Services. Investigators share
information with each other to facilitate their collaborative, multidisciplinary effort.
Safeguarding Children:
􀂃 In the past, if a child was found at a meth lab, the child was removed from the scene,
often to the care of a family friend or relative and insufficient consideration was given
to the effects of the toxic chemicals or hazards the child faced on a daily basis. At
best, a referral would be made to a social service agency.
DEC Protoc7o l
􀂃 The Arizona DEC Program ensures that children receive an immediate and
appropriate medical exam, including a test for exposure to toxic chemicals and
developmental screening. Upon being removed from the crime scene, the children
are showered or bathed to reduce chemical exposure, they are provided with new
clothing, food, and, if needed, crisis counseling. A forensic interview will be
conducted with the child, most often in a child friendly environment. The medical
exam and interview provide important evidence to be used in the drug and child
abuse prosecutions and the dependency case.
On-site Investigation:
􀂃 After the initial emergency response, the appropriate law enforcement unit will
complete the investigation. Once a meth lab site is cleared of the evidence needed
for prosecution, a police officer will affix on the dwelling a notice; this notice will state
that a drug lab was seized and that it is unlawful for anyone, other than the owner,
manager, or remediation firm personnel, to enter the premises. Once the property
owner or manager is notified, a remediation firm recognized by the Arizona State
Board of Technical Registration must clean up the property.
Prosecution:
􀂃 The Arizona Attorney General’s Office has assumed primary responsibility in
Maricopa County for prosecution of cases of both child abuse and dangerous drug
manufacturing. In other areas, the County Attorney assumes responsibility for the
criminal prosecution.
􀂃 The Arizona Attorney General’s Office has statewide jurisdiction over the
dependency action. The Arizona Attorney General’s Office of Victim Services will
work with CPS to identify the guardian of the child victim, and will provide written
notification of case status, including dates and times of all legal hearings to the
guardian. A Victim Advocate is available to accompany the child and/or their legal
guardian to court, as well as to detail victim’s rights and make needed social service
referrals. In some instances, losses to the victim as a result of the crime may be
reimbursable, and the Victim Advocate can provide information about victim
compensation, including costs for such items as counseling.
DEC Protoc8o l
Overview of Investigation
Initial Actions
Safeguarding Children
On Site Investigation
Prosecution
Report Received by Law
Enforcement
􀀹 Confirm Report
􀀹 Establish whether children are present
􀀹 Notify drug investigators, child crime
investigators, and CPS investigators
At the Scene
􀀹 Protect children from further exposure
􀀹 Provide emergency medical treatment if
needed.
Remove the Children
from the Scene
􀀹 Arrange for bathing and clean clothing
􀀹 Schedule medical exam
􀀹 Conduct interview in child friendly
environment
􀀹 Identify safe placement with relatives or
within the foster care system
Law Enforcement 􀀹 Secure the scene
􀀹 Gather evidence for child abuse and drug
charges
􀀹 Post notice that the dwelling was a drug
􀀹 Owner / landlord obtains
remediation firm to clean up the
property pursuant to A.R.S. 12-
1000
Law Enforcement
coordinates gathering
of all evidence and
refers for prosecution
􀀹 Refers to the Attorney General’s Office or
County Attorney’s Office for criminal
prosecution.
􀀹 The Attorney General’s Office is
responsible for the dependency action
initiated by a CPS dependency petition
9DEC Protocol
DRUG ENDANGERED CHILDREN (DEC) PROTOCOL
The following information provides a chronological outline of the DEC Protocol incorporating the activities of law
enforcement, CPS and medical personnel. Although it follows a general chronological order, by the very nature of the
process, many activities will be taking place concurrently. Individual protocols separating the procedures by profession
(law enforcement, CPS, and medical personnel) are included in Appendix A, B, and C.
The protocol provides a general guideline for the procedures to be followed when there is an investigation involving a
drug-endangered child. It is based on model guidelines from throughout the country. The protocol can be revised and
adapted to be more descriptive and specific for local communities to enhance its usefulness at the local level. It is also
suggested that the protocol be reviewed annually and updated as necessary.
Note: For the purposes of this protocol, Law Enforcement could include any combination of a DEC Investigator, a drug
investigator, a child crimes investigator, or an officer that performs multiple functions as may be the case in small
jurisdictions and considering available resources.
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
Law Enforcement
Offices
Law
Enforcement
Officer
Call a briefing about the upcoming investigation.
Invite Child Protective Services
At a time
determined
appropriate by
Law Enforcement
Not applicable
Law Enforcement
Offices: Initial stages
of a drug lab
investigation where
there are indications
of suspected child
abuse.
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Investigator may want to contact a DEC Officer or
other Officer who has specialized expertise in child
crimes.
At a time
appropriate to
make the Officer
a part of the
investigation.
Law
Enforcement
forms
10DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Contact CPS. In Maricopa County, contact can be
made through the pager number established for
meth lab investigations. In other districts, utilize
local procedure that has been established between
law enforcement and CPS.
At a time
determined
appropriate by
law enforcement
Law
Enforcement
forms
CPS staff location CPS
Investigative
Worker
CPS will respond to the request for involvement. In
Maricopa County, if CPS is notified by pager, the
CPS Hotline is called and the report made as soon
as appropriate information is obtained. CPS may
check for prior reports on the family in the CPS
registry
Within two
working hours
Standard Intake
Reporting
Requirements
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Locate the child victim and assess the child's
immediate need for medical attention. This may be
done in concert with the medically trained
personnel (EMT, paramedics) who are on site. If
child's need are emergent, call 911.
As soon as
possible, but not
later than four
hours after the
child is identified
at the lab site.
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Separate the victim from the suspects at the
location and safeguard the child out of view of the
suspects if possible.
As soon as
appropriate within
the investigation
process
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Ensure photographs are taken, prior to searching
or removal of any evidence.
As soon as
appropriate within
the investigation
process
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Identify the parents and obtain biographical
information on suspects, caregivers and witnesses.
As soon as
appropriate within
the investigation
process
Not applicable
11DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Dress the child victim in protective clothing (Tyvex
suit) to prevent exposure to CPS staff,
investigators and others.
As soon as
appropriate within
the investigation
process
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
CPS
Investigative
Worker
Protective suit or other protective covering such as
shoe covers, gloves, and masks should be worn at
the site. All protective covering should be disposed
of at the site. Check with the Lead Officer for
disposal method.
As appropriate. Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Clothing, toys, baby bottles, food or drink shall not
be removed from the scene, as these items are
likely contaminated.
Not applicable Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
CPS
Investigative
Worker
Clothing, toys, baby bottles, food or drink shall not
be removed from the scene, as these items are
likely contaminated.
Not applicable Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Conduct a forensic interview (if possible) of the
child that includes determination of the following:
primary caregiver, child's knowledge of the drug
manufacturing process, victim's living area in
relation to the lab, medical problems, and school
attendance. The child's height and reach should
be measured. The interview should be recorded.
CPS may be present at the interview.
As soon as
appropriate within
the investigation
process
DEC Form
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
CPS
Investigative
Worker
CPS will transport the child to the child advocacy
center or medical facilities for interviews and
additional medical assessment. CPS will make
arrangements with the advocacy center or medical
personnel for medical appointments.
Initial exam
should be set up
within 12 hours of
contact with child
if possible
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
CPS
Investigative
Worker
If the child needs to be removed from the
caregiver's care, serve a temporary custody notice.
As soon as is
appropriate.
Temporary
Custody Notice
12DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
CPS
Investigative
Worker
Work with the appropriate contact (such as the
After Hours Investigative Team [AHIT] or Resource
Unit in Maricopa County) to identify a placement for
the child.
As soon as is
appropriate.
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
CPS
Investigative
Worker
Complete any other on-site investigation necessary
with the assistance of Law Enforcement. (In
general, the law enforcement officer that has
initiated the investigation is the lead individual at
the site.) CPS staff should coordinate any entry
into the lab site with this individual to ensure no
disruption or contamination of evidence. Obtain
birth and medical information from caregivers if
possible.
As soon as is
appropriate.
DEC Form
At the most
appropriate location,
when needed
CPS
Investigative
Worker
If possible, make arrangements for a urine sample
to be obtained from the child or other means for
testing the child for the presence of meth such as
Cozart, which will be used by law enforcement or
physicians. Urine samples should be labeled with
date, time, child's name, and investigator's name
and brought to the medical personnel who will be
conducting the examination. (In the case of
Maricopa County, this is the child advocacy
center.)
As soon as is
practical,
preferably with 12
hours from initial
involvement.
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
CPS
Investigative
Worker
Prior to transporting the child to the medical exam
or placement, the CPS investigative worker should
notify the Law Enforcement Officer of the intent to
leave with the child and provide information about
where the child is being placed.
As soon as
practical
Not applicable
Transportation CPS
Investigative
Worker
Transport the child to the advocacy center, medical
facility, or placement.
As soon as
practical
Not applicable
13DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Diagram and measure all the rooms at the site.
Note if the child had access to the lab.
As soon as
practical
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Identify hazards to the child. As soon as
practical
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Measure and photograph the child's belongings in
proximity to the hazards.
As soon as
practical
Law
Enforcement
forms
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Handling of Evidence: The meth lab investigator
will retain the evidence. Toys, food and any other
items found in proximity to the chemicals should be
included in the items to be tested by the crime lab
(usually the DPS).
Not applicable Law
Enforcement
forms
On-site at the
suspected Meth Lab
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Surveillance equipment, weapons, explosives will
be noted, photographed, and measured.
Document if the weapons were loaded or the
explosives were live.
Not applicable Law
Enforcement
forms
Law Enforcement
Offices
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Complete Child Abuse report that includes CPS
notes, medical records, autopsy reports, diagrams,
and photographs and submit to the appropriate law
enforcement offices.
At the conclusion
of the on-site
investigation
Law
Enforcement
forms
Law Enforcement
Offices
Law
Enforcement
Officer(s)
Follow-up with medical staff about findings and test
results and with CPS concerning medical
placement, and follow-up medical evaluations.
As soon as is
practical.
Not applicable
14DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
At advocacy center,
medical clinic or
child's point of
placement.
CPS
Investigative
Worker
For purposes of evidence collection, the child's
clothing should be removed and placed in a brown
bag. The caregiver should seal the bag with tape
and sign it. The CPS Investigative Worker should
return the clothing to law enforcement.
Arrangements should be made for the child to be
bathed and new clothing put on as soon as is
practical. Also for purposes of evidence collection
as well as safety, children should be handled with
gloves until such time that the child has been
bathed and decontamination has taken place. If
the CPS Investigative Worker does not personally
complete the bathing, specific instructions including
the Instructions for Care Givers of Children
Exposed to Methamphetamine Laboratories should
be provided to the caregiver concerning how to
bath the child and how to handle clothing and the
Tyvex suit.
As soon as is
practical.
Instructions for
Care Givers of
Children
Exposed to
Methamphetami
ne Laboratories
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
CPS
Investigative
Worker
Ensure that the child receives an initial medical
examination.
Preferably within
12 hours of
identification
Not applicable
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Obtain child's medical history, either from CPS or
from caregiver.
Preferably within
12 hours of
identification
Medical
Records if
available
15DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Administer test and procedures. Ensure that urine
sample was gathered. Request Urine Screen.
Perform complete pediatric exam and include as
much of the Early Periodic Screening, Detection
and Treatment (EPSDT) Protocol as possible.
Particular emphasis should be placed on
neurological screen, respiratory status, and
cardiovascular status. Required clinical
evaluations include: vital signs, height, and weight.
Head circumference should be measured for
children less than two years old and arm span and
reach for all children less than five years old.
Optional tests as medically necessary including
CBC, Liver Function, Electrolytes and Kidney
Function, Complete Metabolic Panel, Pulmonary
Function Tests, Chest X-Ray, Skeletal Survey for
children less than three years of age when physical
abuse is suspected, Oxygen Saturation, and Heavy
Metals Screen.
Preferably within
12 hours of
identification
EPSDT Form
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Conduct Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect
Screen.
Preferably within
12 hours of
identification
Medical records
forms
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Provide a behavioral health referral if appropriate. Preferably within
12 hours of
identification
Local forms if
available.
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Secure release of the child's medical records to
appropriate authorities (CPS, Law Enforcement)
Preferably within
12 hours of
identification
Not applicable
CPS staff location CPS
Investigative
Worker
Identify the ongoing worker to whom the case will
be transferred and notify the DEC Officer or Officer
Assigned
Within 30 days CPS forms
16DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Team
Member
Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
CPS staff location CPS
Investigative
or Ongoing
Worker
The CPS Investigative or Ongoing Worker is
responsible for ensuring that the child is seen for
follow up examinations.
2-4 weeks after
initial medical visit
Not applicable
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Conduct reevaluation of the comprehensive health
status of the child.
2-4 weeks after
initial medical visit
Medical records
forms
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Conduct formal development assessment on child
less than six years of age using the Denver
Developmental Screening Tool.
2-4 weeks after
initial medical visit
Denver
Developmental
Screening Tool
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Follow-up on any abnormal screening laboratory
tests, or administer screening laboratory tests as
indicated.
2-4 weeks after
initial medical visit
Not applicable
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Arrange for appropriate follow-up as indicated. 2-4 weeks after
initial medical visit
Not applicable
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Medical
Personnel
Evaluate adequacy of placement with regard to
medical needs.
2-4 weeks after
initial medical visit
Not applicable
17DEC Protocol
APPENDICES
The following appendices are attached:
Appendix A: Child Protective Services DEC Protocol
Appendix B: Law Enforcement DEC Protocol
Appendix C: Medical Personnel DEC Protocol
Appendix D: Resource Information
Appendix E: Statutes
Appendix F: How to Start a Local DEC Team
Appendix G: Exposing Children to Drugs and Clandestine Meth Labs is Child Abuse
Appendix H: Sample Forms
18DEC Protocol
Appendix A: CPS DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Procedure Timeline Reporting
Form
CPS staff location The CPS Investigative or Ongoing Worker is responsible for
ensuring that the child is seen for follow up examinations.
2-4 weeks after
initial medical
visit
Not
applicable
CPS staff location CPS will respond to the request for involvement. In Maricopa
County, if CPS is notified by pager, the CPS Hotline is called and
the report made as soon as appropriate information is obtained.
CPS may check for prior reports on the family in the CPS registry
Within two
working hours
Standard
Intake
Reporting
Requireme
nts
On-site at the suspected
Meth Lab
Protective suit or other protective covering such as shoe covers,
gloves, and masks should be worn at the site. All protective
covering should be disposed of at the site. Check with the Lead
Officer for disposal method.
As appropriate. Not
applicable
On-site at the suspected
Meth Lab
Clothing, toys, baby bottles, food or drink shall not be removed from
the scene, as these items are likely contaminated.
Not applicable Not
applicable
On-site at the suspected
Meth Lab
CPS will transport the child to the child advocacy center or medical
facilities for interviews and additional medical assessment. CPS will
make arrangements with the advocacy center or medical personnel
for medical appointments.
Initial exam
should be set up
within 12 hours
of contact with
child if possible
Not
applicable
On-site at the suspected
Meth Lab
If the child needs to be removed from the caregiver's care, serve a
temporary custody notice.
As soon as is
appropriate.
Temporary
Custody
Notice
On-site at the suspected
Meth Lab
Work with the appropriate contact (such as the After Hours
Investigative Team [AHIT] or Resource Unit in Maricopa County) to
identify a placement for the child.
As soon as is
appropriate.
Not
applicable
On-site at the suspected
Meth Lab
Complete any other on-site investigation necessary with the
assistance of Law Enforcement. (In general, the law enforcement
officer that has initiated the investigation is the lead individual at the
site.) CPS staff should coordinate any entry into the lab site with
this individual to ensure no disruption or contamination of evidence.
Obtain birth and medical information from caregivers if possible.
As soon as is
appropriate.
DEC Form
At the most appropriate
location, when needed
If possible, make arrangements for a urine sample to be obtained
from the child or other means for testing the child for the presence
of meth such as Cozart, which will be used by law enforcement or
physicians. Urine samples should be labeled with date, time, child's
name, and investigator's name and brought to the medical
personnel who will be conducting the examination. (In the case of
Maricopa County, this is the child advocacy center.)
As soon as is
practical,
preferably with
12 hours from
initial
involvement.
Not
applicable
On-site at the suspected
Meth Lab
Prior to transporting the child to the medical exam or placement, the
CPS investigative worker should notify the Law Enforcement Officer
of the intent to leave with the child and provide information about
where the child is being placed.
As soon as
practical
Not
applicable
Transportation Transport the child to the advocacy center, medical facility, or
placement.
As soon as
practical
Not
applicable
At advocacy center,
medical clinic or child's
point of placement.
For purposes of evidence collection, tthe child's clothing should be
removed and placed in a brown bag. The caregiver should seal the
bag with tape and sign it. The CPS Investigative Worker should
return the clothing to law enforcement. Arrangements should be
made for the child to be bathed new clothing put on as soon as is
practical. Also for purposes of evidence collection as well as safety,
children should be handled with gloves until such time that the child
has been bathed and decontamination has taken place. If the CPS
Investigative Worker does not personally complete the bathing,
specific instructions including the Instructions for Care Givers of
Children Exposed to Methamphetamine Laboratories should be
provided to the caregiver concerning how to bath the child and how
to handle clothing and the Tyvex suit.
As soon as is
practical.
Instructions
for Care
Givers of
Children
Exposed to
Methamphe
tamine
Laboratorie
s
CPS staff location Identify the ongoing worker to whom the case will be transferred
and notify the DEC Officer or Officer Assigned
Within 30 days CPS forms
At advocacy center or
medical clinic
Ensure that the child receives an initial medical examination. Preferably within
12 hours of
identification
Not
applicable
19DEC Protocol
Appendix B: Law Enforcement DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Procedure Timeline Reporting Form
Law Enforcement
Offices
Call a briefing about the upcoming investigation. Invite Child
Protective Services
At a time determined
appropriate by Law
Enforcement
Not applicable
Law Enforcement
Offices:
Initial stages of a drug lab investigation where there are
indications of suspected child abuse. Investigator may want to
contact a DEC Officer or other Officer who has specialized
expertise in child crimes.
At a time appropriate
to make the Officer a
part of the
investigation.
Law
Enforcement
forms
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Contact CPS. In Maricopa County, contact can be made
through the pager number established for meth lab
investigations. In other districts, utilize local procedure that has
been established between law enforcement and CPS.
At a time determined
appropriate by the law
enforcement
Law
Enforcement
forms
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Locate the child victim and assess the child's immediate need
for medical attention. This may be done in concert with the
medically trained personnel (EMT, paramedics) who are on
site. If child's need are emergent, call 911.
As soon as possible,
but not later than four
hours after the child is
identified at the lab
site.
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Separate the victim from the suspects at the location and
safeguard the child out of view of the suspects if possible.
As soon as
appropriate within the
investigation process
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Ensure photographs are taken, prior to searching or removal of
any evidence.
As soon as
appropriate within the
investigation process
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Identify the parents and obtain biographical information on
suspects, caregivers and witnesses.
As soon as
appropriate within the
investigation process
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Dress the child victim in protective clothing (Tyvex suit) to
prevent exposure to CPS staff, investigators and others.
As soon as
appropriate within the
investigation process
Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Clothing, toys, baby bottles, food or drink shall not be removed
from the scene, as these items are likely contaminated.
Not applicable Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Conduct a forensic interview (if possible) of the child that
includes determination of the following: primary caregiver,
child's knowledge of the drug manufacturing process, victim's
living area in relation to the lab, medical problems, and school
attendance. The child's height and reach should be measured.
The interview should be recorded. CPS may be present at the
interview.
As soon as
appropriate within the
investigation process
DEC Form
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Diagram and measure all the rooms at the site. Note if the child
had access to the lab.
As soon as practical Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Identify hazards to the child. As soon as practical Not applicable
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Measure and photograph the child's belongings in proximity to
the hazards.
As soon as practical Law
Enforcement
forms
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Handling of Evidence: The meth lab investigator will retain the
evidence. Toys, food and any other items found in proximity to
the chemicals should be included in the items to be tested by
the crime lab (usually the DPS).
Not applicable Law
Enforcement
forms
On-site at the
suspected Meth
Lab
Surveillance equipment, weapons, explosives will be noted,
photographed, and measured. Document if the weapons were
loaded or the explosives were live.
Not applicable Law
Enforcement
forms
Law Enforcement
Offices
Complete Child Abuse report that includes CPS notes, medical
records, autopsy reports, diagrams, and photographs and
submit to the appropriate law enforcement offices.
At the conclusion of
the on-site
investigation
Law
Enforcement
forms
Law Enforcement
Offices
Follow-up with medical staff about findings and test results and
with CPS concerning medical placement, and follow-up medical
evaluations.
As soon as is
practical.
Not applicable
20DEC Protocol
Appendix C: Medical Personnel DEC Protocol
􀀵 Location Procedure Timeline Reporting Form
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Obtain child's medical history, either from CPS or from
caregiver.
Preferably within 12
hours of identification
Medical Records if
available
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Administer test and procedures. Ensure that urine sample
was gathered. Request Urine Screen. Perform complete
pediatric exam and include as much of the Early Periodic
Screening, Detection and Treatment (EPSDT) Protocol as
possible. Particular emphasis should be placed on
neurological screen, respiratory status, and cardiovascular
status. Required clinical evaluations include: vital signs,
height, and weight. Head circumference should be measured
for children less than two years old. Arm span and reach for
all children less than five years old. Optional tests as
medically necessary including CBC, Liver Function,
Electrolytes and Kidney Function, Complete Metabolic Panel,
Pulmonary Function Tests, Chest X-Ray, Skeletal Survey for
children less than three years of age when physical abuse is
suspected, Oxygen Saturation, and Heavy Metals Screen.
Preferably within 12
hours of identification
EPSDT Form
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Conduct Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Screen. Preferably within 12
hours of identification
Medical records
forms
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Provide a behavioral health referral if appropriate. Preferably within 12
hours of identification
Local forms if
available.
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Secure release of the child's medical records to appropriate
authorities (CPS, Law Enforcement)
Preferably within 12
hours of identification
Not applicable
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Conduct reevaluation of the comprehensive health status of
the child.
2-4 weeks after initial
medical visit
Medical records
forms
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Conduct formal development assessment on child less than
six years of age using the Denver Developmental Screening
Tool.
2-4 weeks after initial
medical visit
Denver
Developmental
Screening Tool
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Follow-up on any abnormal screening laboratory tests, or
administer screening laboratory tests as indicated.
2-4 weeks after initial
medical visit
Not applicable
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Arrange for appropriate follow-up as indicated. 2-4 weeks after initial
medical visit
Not applicable
At advocacy center
or medical clinic
Evaluate adequacy of placement with regard to medical
needs.
2-4 weeks after initial
medical visit
Not applicable
21DEC Protocol
Appendix D: Resource Information
Please visit the Arizona Drug Endangered Children Website which is a part of the
Arizona Attorney General’s Office website at www.azag.gov/DEC for a
comprehensive listing of resource information including upcoming training, conferences
and events. The following are highlights of the available information:
Colorado’s Alliance for Drug Endangered Children,
http://www.nmtf.us/colodec/colodec.htm
Riverside County California, Drug Endangered Children Program,
http://dec.co.riverside.ca.us/
Drug Endangered Children Resource Center, www.decresourcecenter.org
Child Abuse and Training and Technical Assistance Centers, California Institute on
Human Services, Sonoma State University, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park,
California 94928, 707.664.2416
Methamphetamine Laboratories, A Prosecutor’s Guide, Los Angeles County District
Attorney’s Office, Barbara Turner, Assistant Head Deputy, Major Narcotics Division
Child Abuse in Meth Labs, Detective Tim Ahumada, Phoenix Police Department Crimes
Against Children Detail
Drug Endangered Children, Drug Endangered Children Resource Center, Sabine M.
Oishi, Kathleen M. West, and Shelby Stuntz, with assistance from Mark Miller and
Amanda L. Noble, May 2000
Stopdrugs.org, California Department of Justice and the California Narcotic’s Officer
Association
American Council for Drug Education, http://www.acde.org
Center for Disease Control CDC, http://www.cdc.org
Child Help USA, http://www.childhelpusa.org
Clandestine Laboratory Investigator’s Association, http://www.clialabs.com
Crystal Meth Anonymous, http://www.crystalmeth.org
Koch Crime Institute (KCI), http://www.kci.org
National Crime Prevention Council, http://ncpc.org
22DEC Protocol
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), http://www.NIDA.nih.gov
National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Information 1-800-729-6686,
http://www.health.org
Office of National Drug Control Policy, http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov
U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, http://www.ojp.usdog.gov/ovc
Arizona Revised Statutes, http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/ars.htm
23DEC Protocol
Appendix E: Statutes
The following provides an overview of statutes relevant to the DEC program. The
complete Arizona Revised Statutes can be found at
http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/ars.htm.
There are several laws that apply to the operation of a meth lab, drug laws and
environmental laws, and where children are involved, child abuse laws. Like many other
states, Arizona law requires a mandatory prison sentence when there is a conviction for
methamphetamine production. Manufacturing dangerous drugs in the presence of
children, especially young children, can dramatically increase the penalties incurred
from the drug charges.
In July 2000, Arizona child abuse law, A.R.S. §13-3623, was expanded to add a
provision that provides a presumption of endangerment when children or vulnerable
adults are discovered at meth labs. This addition to Arizona law essentially creates strict
liability when a person places a child in a location where a meth lab is present.
Child Abuse
A.R.S. §13-3623, Child or vulnerable adult abuse; emotional abuse; classification;
exception; definitions, (C) provides:
For the purposes of subsections A and B of this section, the terms endangered and
abuse include but are not limited to circumstances in which a child or vulnerable adult is
permitted to enter or remain in any structure or vehicle in which volatile, toxic or
flammable chemicals are found or equipment is possessed by any person for the
purpose of manufacturing a dangerous drug in violation of A.R.S. § 13-3407, subsection
A, paragraph 4.
Drug Offenses
A.R.S. §13-3407, Possession, use, administration, acquisition, sale, manufacture or
transportation of dangerous drugs; classification, defines the class of felony for a variety
of drug related crimes.
A.R.S. §13-3401, Drug Offenses, Definitions, provides definitions for drugs and
substances and other related terminology, including the definition of manufacture.
A.R.S. §13-3404.01, Possession or sale of precursor chemicals, regulated chemicals,
substances or equipment: exceptions and classifications defines the class of felony
related to precursor chemicals and related items. Pseudoephedrine is a precursor
chemical to the manufacture of methamphetamine. Regulated chemicals include Iodine
and Red Phosphorous.
24DEC Protocol
Environmental Law
Effective July 1, 2003, A.R.S. §12-1000, Clandestine drug laboratories; notice; cleanup;
residual contamination; civil penalty; immunity; restitution; violation; classification
indirectly supports the child abuse law. In summary, this law makes it unlawful for any
person other than the owner, landlord or manager to enter the property where
dangerous drugs were being manufactured until it is cleaned of residual contamination
by a state approved drug laboratory site remediation firm. This law ensures that CPS
will not be returning a child to a residence that operated as a drug lab, at least until it is
determined safe by strict standards. This law also protects the public, who knowingly or
otherwise would become residents of a former drug lab where residual contamination
from the manufacturing of dangerous drugs remained.
Effective June 11, 2003, A.R.S. §12-1001, Joint legislative oversight committee on
residual contamination of drug properties was established to submit a report of findings
and provide recommendations to the Governor, President of the Senate and the
Speaker of the House of Representatives about the effectiveness of the program
established by A.R.S. §12-1000.
A.R.S. §12-990, Article 12. abatement of crime property became effective June 2003,
and defines clandestine drug laboratory, drug laboratory site remediation firm, various
drugs, and criteria for contamination.
25DEC Protocol
Appendix F: How to Start a DEC Team
The Drug Endangered Children Resource Center
(http://www.decresourcecenter.org/DECresource.html) suggests the following steps that
local communities can take to start a DEC Team:
1. Consider possible team members from each agency including CPS, Prosecutor’s
Office, Law Enforcement, and Medical Personnel. Find individuals who are interested in
the issue and like working with multidisciplinary teams.
2. Schedule time for regular meetings and decide how to communicate (i.e. email,
phone, fax, etc.) Develop a consistent structure for the meetings. Ongoing discussions
could take place about what are DEC team goals and what are team priorities in
handling a case.
3. Develop a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Components of the MOU might
include:
􀂃 Purpose
􀂃 Mission, Goals, and Purpose Statement
o Responsibilities of Each Team Member representing the overall multidisciplinary
protocol.
o Process for Review and Revision
o Forms
o Identification of Helpful Resources
o Signature Page for all Agencies
4. Develop a local protocol for what should happen during an intervention at a meth lab
where children are present.
5. Distribute draft protocols among agency colleagues for input/feedback. Revise
protocol based on feedback. Publish the protocol with a date and caveat that revisions
will take place as appropriate.
6. Identify team member’s need for informal and formal training.
7. Identify key auxiliary agencies that the team wants involved in DEC cases that need
DEC training. Agencies could include behavioral health providers, fire personnel, foster
parents, probation/parole officers, school personnel, substance use treatment providers,
domestic violence service providers, and court personnel. Schedule meetings to explain
DEC.
8. Outreach to service providers to assist DEC children and families. Develop additional
MOUs to build multidisciplinary support and comprehensive interventions.
9. Develop a locally relevant training module that DEC team members can present to
non-DEC agencies and organizations for outreach and/or education at the local level to
build community support for DEC teamwork and assist in prevention efforts.
26DEC Protocol
10. Develop a method to monitor progress and effectiveness of the protocols and
discuss how the DEC process can be improved.
Contact Mark Evans, Assistant Attorney General at mark.evans@azag.gov for
additional information.
27DEC Protocol
Appendix G: Exposing Children to Drugs and Clandestine Meth Labs is Child
Abuse
Exposure to meth manufacturing can harm anyone, but is particularly dangerous to
children. This is why once discovered; children who live in meth labs need special and
immediate attention from a variety of professionals including medical, legal, and child
welfare. The dangers include contamination, fire and explosions, child abuse and
neglect, hazardous living conditions, and other social problems.
Contamination: One of the greatest dangers of a meth lab is contamination.
Contamination can occur in a number of ways, through the skin, soiled clothing,
household items used in the lab, second hand smoke and ingestion. Children living in
meth labs are more likely than adults to absorb more of the chemicals into their bodies
because of their size, and higher rates of metabolism and respiration.
The chemicals used to produce meth are often stored in unlabeled food and drink
containers on floors and countertops placing toddlers and infants at increased risk of
harm due to normal child behaviors such as putting their hands and other objects into
their mouths, crawling, and playing on floors. Poor ventilation due to attempts to seal in
smells and add privacy increases the likelihood of inhaling toxic fumes. It is common for
children living in and around meth labs to be exposed to waste byproducts dumped in
outside play areas. While much remains to be learned about the long-term medical
consequences of meth exposure in childhood, potential damage from chemical
exposure includes anemia, neurologic symptoms, and ongoing respiratory problems.
Fires and Explosions: Many meth labs are discovered as a result of fires or explosions.
Even without a heat source, fires can start from chemical vapors and spread very
quickly. For instance, plugging in an appliance near lab fumes presents a danger of fire.
Young children are less likely than adults to escape from or survive a meth lab-related
fire or explosion. This is not only because of their age and lack of mobility, but because
their caretakers are often drug dependent and do not attempt to, or may not have the
capacity to save them.
Child Abuse and Neglect. The presence of meth manufacturing is often accompanied by
increased risk of other problems such as domestic violence; severe physical neglect
(i.e., lack of food, medical, and dental care and appropriate supervision); emotional
neglect, and physical and sexual abuse. Children who live in meth labs experience
chaotic home environments, with poor supervision, and adult role models who are
involved in criminal behaviors. The use of illicit drugs and heavy alcohol use affect
caregiver judgment, putting children at increased risk of abuse and neglect. Many
children who live in meth labs are also exposed to pornographic material and overt
sexual activity.
Hazardous Living Conditions: Hazardous living conditions and filth are common in
home-based meth labs. Play, sleep and eating areas may be infested with rodents and
insects. Rotten food, used needles, dirty clothes and dishes, animal feces, and garbage
28DEC Protocol
piled on floors and counters, are commonly found by investigating officers. Drug
paraphernalia such as razor blades, needles, and pipes are often within a child’s reach.
Explosives and booby traps are used to protect the meth lab from discovery. Booby
traps can include hidden sticks with exposed nails or spikes, and switches wired to
explosives. Firearms have been found at some meth labs, loaded and in easy-to-reach
locations. Children may be shocked or electrocuted from exposed wires or as a result of
unsafe electrical practices used in the meth manufacturing process. Dangerous dogs
used to protect the premises from intruders can also pose physical danger to the
children.
Social Problems: Children living in meth labs often experience stress and trauma that
can affect their behavioral, emotional, and cognitive functioning. They often exhibit low
self-esteem, a sense of shame, and poor social skills. Many have attachment problems
and are not emotionally bonded to a parent or other caring adult. Symptoms of
attachment disorder include an inability to trust, form healthy relationships, and adapt to
change. Consequences may include mental health problems, delinquency, teen
pregnancy, school failure, isolation and poor peer relations. The problems the children
encounter may lead them to model their parents’ drug use, thus perpetuating the cycle.
(Adapted from Karen Swetlow, June 2003, Children at Clandestine Methamphetamine
Labs: Helping Meth’s Youngest Victims, OVC Bulletin, pp. 1-10; Clair Keithley, Deputy
District Attorney, Butte County, Theories of Child Endangerment)
29DEC Protocol
Appendix H: Sample Forms
Samples of the following are included as examples of forms that are appropriate for use
as a part of the DEC protocol.
H.1. Meth Lab Investigation Form – Child Protective Services
H.2. Methamphetamine Medical Screen Approval Form
In addition, forms used for the medical evaluation can be found at the following
websites:
Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) form --
http://www.ahcccs.state.az.us/PlansProviders/Forms/OMM_EPSDT/epsdt_trackformspg.asp
Denver Developmental Screening Tool -- http://www.denverii.com/home.html
30DEC Protocol
Appendix H.1-Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services
SAMPLE
CASE NAME ______________________________ DR#_____________________
ADDRESS_________________________________________________________________
PHONE#________________
ASSIGNED CASE WORKER: ____________________________
PRIORS YES NO UNKNOWN
RESPONDING LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPERVISOR NAME ________________________
HIDTA
CHILDHELP DETECTIVE NAME’S _____________________________
______________________________
31DEC Protocol
Sample Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services (continued)
MOTHER
MOTHER’S NAME___________________________________ D.O.B. ________________
SS# ______________________
PLACE OF BIRTH _____________________ RACE____________
MARRIED YES NO IF YES, TO WHOM AND WHEN____________________________
MAIDEN NAME_________________________________
EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION_________________________________________________
OTHER INCOME SOURCES____________________________________________________
EDUCATION COMPLETED_____________________________________________________
OTHER AGENCY OR PROVIDER INVOLVEMENT_____________________________________
OTHER INFORMATION_______________________________________________________
FATHER #1
FATHER’S NAME _____________________________________D.O.B._______________
FATHER TO WHOM:_______________________________________________________
SS# _______________________
PLACE OF BIRTH _____________________ RACE _____________
MARRIED YES NO IF YES, TO WHOM AND WHEN____________________________
EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION_________________________________________________
OTHER INCOME SOURCES____________________________________________________
EDUCATION COMPLETED_____________________________________________________
OTHER AGENCY OR PROVIDER INVOLVEMENT_____________________________________
OTHER INFORMATION______________________________________________________
32DEC Protocol
Sample Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services (continued)
FATHER #2
FATHER’S NAME _____________________________________D.O.B._________________
FATHER TO WHOM:_________________________________________________________
SS# _______________________
PLACE OF BIRTH _____________________ RACE _____________
MARRIED YES NO IF YES, TO WHOM AND WHEN____________________________
EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION_________________________________________________
OTHER INCOME SOURCES____________________________________________________
EDUCATION COMPLETED_____________________________________________________
OTHER AGENCY OR PROVIDER INVOLVEMENT_____________________________________
OTHER INFORMATION______________________________________________________
FATHER #3
FATHER’S NAME _____________________________________D.O.B._________________
FATHER TO WHOM:________________________________________
SS# _______________________
PLACE OF BIRTH _____________________ RACE _____________
MARRIED YES NO IF YES, TO WHOM AND WHEN____________________________
EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION_________________________________________________
OTHER INCOME SOURCES____________________________________________________
EDUCATION COMPLETED_____________________________________________________
OTHER AGENCY OR PROVIDER INVOLVEMENT_____________________________________
OTHER INFORMATION______________________________________________________
33DEC Protocol
Sample Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services (continued)
CHILDREN
CHILD NAME #1 ______________________________________D.O.B _______________
SS#_________________________
PLACE OF BIRTH ________________________________ FEMALE MALE
ANY MEDICAL PROBLEMS ____________________________________________________
HEALTH PLAN ________________________ DR. NAME _____________________________
SHOT’S UP TO DATE YES NO ATTENDING SCHOOL _________________________
ADDRESS __________________________________ PHONE _______________
OTHER INFORMATION:
CHILD NAME #2 ______________________________________D.O.B _______________
SS#_________________________
PLACE OF BIRTH ________________________________ FEMALE MALE
ANY MEDICAL PROBLEMS ____________________________________________________
HEALTH PLAN ________________________ DR. NAME _____________________________
SHOT’S UP TO DATE YES NO ATTENDING SCHOOL _________________________
ADDRESS __________________________________ PHONE _______________
OTHER INFORMATION:
34DEC Protocol
Sample Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services (continued)
CHILD NAME #3 ______________________________________D.O.B _______________
SS#_________________________
PLACE OF BIRTH ________________________________ FEMALE MALE
ANY MEDICAL PROBLEMS ____________________________________________________
HEALTH PLAN ________________________ DR. NAME _____________________________
SHOT’S UP TO DATE YES NO ATTENDING SCHOOL _________________________
ADDRESS __________________________________ PHONE _______________
OTHER INFORMATION:
CHILD NAME #4 ______________________________________D.O.B _______________
SS#_________________________
PLACE OF BIRTH ________________________________ FEMALE MALE
ANY MEDICAL PROBLEMS ____________________________________________________
HEALTH PLAN ________________________ DR. NAME _____________________________
SHOT’S UP TO DATE YES NO ATTENDING SCHOOL _________________________
ADDRESS __________________________________ PHONE _______________
OTHER INFORMATION:
35DEC Protocol
Sample Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services (continued)
CHILD NAME #5 ______________________________________D.O.B _______________
SS#_________________________
PLACE OF BIRTH ________________________________ FEMALE MALE
ANY MEDICAL PROBLEMS ____________________________________________________
HEALTH PLAN ________________________ DR. NAME _____________________________
SHOT’S UP TO DATE YES NO ATTENDING SCHOOL _________________________
ADDRESS __________________________________ PHONE _______________
OTHER INFORMATION:
36DEC Protocol
Sample Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services (continued)
RELATIVES
NAME:_______________________________________ PHONE:_________________
ADDRESS:_____________________________________________________________
RELATIONSHIP:_________________________________
DOB:________________________ SS#____________________________
OTHER INFORMATION:_________________________________________
NAME:_______________________________________ PHONE:_________________
ADDRESS:_____________________________________________________________
RELATIONSHIP:_________________________________
DOB:________________________ SS#____________________________
OTHER INFORMATION:_________________________________________
NAME:________________________________________ PHONE:_________________
ADDRESS:_____________________________________________________________
RELATIONSHIP:_________________________________
DOB:________________________ SS#____________________________
OTHER INFORMATION:_________________________________________
37DEC Protocol
Sample Meth Lab Investigation Form, Child Protective Services (continued)
TYPE OF CUSTODY TCN POA OTHER
ARRESTS: YES NO MOTHER FATHER OTHER
ICWA: ____________________ DV: _____________________
CHEMICALS / EQUIPMENT____________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________
CHILDREN ACCESS TO LAB YES NO WHERE_______________________________
IF YES, HOW AND WHERE_____________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________
VENTING IN HOME YES NO
IF NO, WHERE VENTING______________________________________________________
PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN BY CPS PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN BY PD
VIDEO TAKEN ON SCENE PS045 REVIEWED/SIGNED
PAC189 GIVEN PAC518 GIVEN
CHILD SAFETY ASSESSMENT COMPLETED
38DEC Protocol
Appendix H.2-Methamphetamine Medical Screen Approval Form
SAMPLE
FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAM APPROVAL FORM
This form is used by CPS and medical professionals to document authorization for a
forensic medical exam to be completed.
Case Name: _________________________________Case ID# __________
Participant Name: _______________________________________________
Participant ID# : _________________________________________________
Case Manager: __________________________________Date: ___________
************************************************************************
The above listed case has been staffed with the assigned case manager and supervisor
in accordance to District I policy. Dr. ____________________ (Contracted Physician)
has been authorized to conduct a forensic medical exam on
___________________(today’s date).
Additional comments: ___________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Signature of Case Manager: _________________________ Date:________________
Signature of Supervisor: _______________________________ Date: _____________
Distribution: CPS Case File
Contracted Forensic Medical Exam Physician